3 Types of ADHD

Children with ADHD are often mislabeled because their struggles appear to mimic the normal challenges of childhood, like periods of hyperactivity and learning to pay attention. 

But when your child has ADHD, their challenges are more persistent and severe than typical kid behavior because they come from neurological differences in the brain.

If your child has ADHD, they’re not purposefully misbehaving or ignoring you. They just don’t have the natural ability to focus, sit still, take turns, or follow directions because they have neurological deficits that cause the characteristics of ADHD: inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity.

Many parents wonder if their child’s struggles are a sign of ADHD, so the team at THINK Neurology for Kids put together this overview of the three types of ADHD. We hope this information helps you identify the classic ADHD symptoms, but if you have any questions about your child’s behavior, give us a call — we’re here to help.

ADHD: Inattentive type

ADHD stands for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Some children only struggle with the “attention deficit” part of ADHD. This type is called ADHD with inattentive presentation, but you may also know it as attention deficit disorder (ADD).

Children who are diagnosed with the inattentive type of ADHD exhibit six or more of the following symptoms. Your child may:

The real challenge is determining where these inattentive behaviors cross the line from typical child behavior to ADHD. The best guideline is this: When your child’s inattention interferes with their social or family life or when it negatively affects their school performances, it’s time to have them screened for ADHD.

ADHD: Hyperactivity and impulsivity type

Your child may do a great job paying attention, but struggle with issues related to hyperactivity and impulsivity. Like the inattentive type, it takes six or more symptoms to receive a diagnosis of ADHD marked by hyperactivity and impulsivity.

Your child may have ADHD if they:

Both the inattentive type and the hyperactivity/impulsivity type share symptoms with other mental health disorders. ADHD also commonly co-occurs with other developmental disabilities, such as autism. We carefully evaluate your child using FDA-cleared tests to determine if their behaviors are caused by ADHD or another concern.

ADHD: Combined type

We diagnose the third type of ADHD — ADHD with combined presentation — when your child meets the criteria for both the inattentive and hyperactivity/impulsivity types.

The providers at THINK take a unique neurological approach in evaluating ADHD by investigating potential underlying neurological issues that could lead to inattention and poor school performance. 

The behavioral and emotional challenges of ADHD can be overcome with our comprehensive therapies and treatments, including medications and behavioral therapy for children, as well as working with parents and teachers, teaching them how to support their kids with ADHD.

If you need help with your child’s performance or you have any questions about ADHD, call one of our offices in The Woodlands, Katy, and Cypress, Texas, or request an appointment online today.

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